Marvin Nichols Reservoir, Part 2

Proposed Marvin Nichols Reservoir(Part 1 is here)

When we realized Region C wasn’t going to back down from their desire to build this reservoir, landowners united again.

Landowners filed a lawsuit against the Texas Water Development Board, basically stating they needed to acknowledge the conflict between Region C and Region D water plans. The district court sided with the landowners and told the TWDB to resolve the conflict. TWDB decided to appeal that decision, sending the case to the appellate court. The appellate court also sided with the landowners saying that there was a conflict and the TWDB needed to resolve the conflict. (May 2013)

Today, we are witnessing the attempt by the TWDB to “resolve” the conflict. However, you be the judge and see what you think about the recommendation by the TWDB. It seems like the TWDB has basically told one side to hush while the other side can continue to keep this reservoir in their plan. Does this seem like a way to “resolve” the conflict? It seems as if all the facts of the negative impacts to our area just go unnoticed. Do they understand how losing $87-247 million dollars annually could hurt our economy here in Northeast Texas. (Texas Forestry Study from 2002)

Maybe a deeper look into some relationships that have been going strong for decades can help people see more to this water battle. The engineering firm that would be the leader of this project is called Freese & Nichols. Ring any bells? In 1927 Marvin Nichols joined the firm of what is now called Freese & Nichols. At that time they had just been awarded a contract with the Tarrant County Water Control and Improvement District #1. (http://www.freese.com/about-us/history) I wonder if it was at this point that the founders of Freese and Nichols realized that local and state water planners would be their gravy train?

There are so many questions about Freese & Nichols. Our Texas Water Development Board knows the people of Freese & Nichols well. A quick stop on their website (https://www.twdb.texas.gov/) and you can look at many reports that are compiled by Freese & Nichols. All this to say that the TWDB and Freese & Nichols seem to have been working closely for decades.

Again, time for you to be the judge. Why would the Sulphur River Basin Authority contract 100% of their water rights to the Metroplex for this water? I witnessed the President of the SRBA dance all around a question he was asked by the political representative from International Paper about this very fact. The SRBA was on a tour that day this past January. During that time the President of the SRBA was asked about the water rights. Why didn’t he answer the man’s question? Are they hiding something? It makes you wonder who does the SRBA represent. It doesn’t seem like they have the interest of Northeast Texas at heart.

Lastly, the action we need to take is this, FIGHT! Fight for your rights as landowners. Fight for your fellow Texans who are feeling the squeeze by Dallas/Ft Worth to have more power. Fight for your economy in Northeast Texas to remain strong. I attended the Texarkana College debate club a month ago and I’ll never forget what one of the young men said. I don’t have his name but I’ll gladly give him credit when I do find his name. He said if Dallas/Ft. Worth needed water we would give it to them — we just hope they wouldn’t pour it on their green grass.

How can you FIGHT? Attend the comment meeting coming next week in Mt Pleasant. The date is Tuesday, April 29, 2014 @ 2pm in Mt Pleasant at their Civic Center. (1800 N Jefferson St Mt Pleasant, TX ) Come RALLY with us!! We plan to let the TWDB hear and know just why we can’t let this reservoir ever become a reality! We will be there around 1:15pm. See you there!

Following this comment meeting is the meeting in the DFW area and it is on Wednesday, April 30, 2014 @ 2pm. That meeting will be held at the Bob Duncan Center in Arlington, TX. (2800 S Center St Arlington, TX) ATTEND A MEETING TO FIGHT FOR YOUR RIGHTS!

0 thoughts on “Marvin Nichols Reservoir, Part 2

  1. Good article. But there is much more that is not stated. I followed our Region D Water Board beginning about 2000. That Board was headed by Mike Huddleson. He provided briefs to select government and social groups about the lake benefits and the local media bought into all of it. They even reported on presentations where attendees were told they could not ask questions. Anything that questioned the impact of Marvin Nichols was labeled “beyond the scope of current phase”. The main question should have been what impact will Marvin Nichols have on water level of Wright Patman. The water captured in Wright Patman includes the Sulphur River watershed between Cooper Lake and Wright Patman. Marvin Nochols will reduce that water shed by about 60%. The original Regions C & D proposal had Dallas controling 90% of the water. At that time, Mike Huddleson was member of both our Region D water group and Sulphur River Basin Authority. Once our Region D group started to ask questions, Huddleston left the group. Later he orchestrated the new Wright Patman water district representing the local small towns. One of the stated purposes of that group was to acquire water from any source. That allowed them to support Marvin Nichols outside our Region D. That group has now evolved into Riverbend. Now it appears the SRBA has taken up the cause for Marvin Nichols as an end around Region D.

  2. Rick, write it up with as much detail as you want, and I’ll publish it.

  3. I know Riverbend has been restructured. The group with Mike Huddleston has been removed!!!!!

  4. Proposed Marvin Nichols Reservoir is way to big with it’s several hundred thousand acres of mitigation lands for the counties joining the proposed reservoir. Our local economies can not stand it with loss of tax base, jobs, timber industry, agricultural ranching and farming, and environmental concerns such as wildlife. Let your voices be heard while you can. Attend one of the meetings.

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