Clinton S. Thomas, Th.D.

Clinton S. Thomas, Th.D.

A published writer of poetry, fiction, and non-fiction in both the digital age and the pre-digital age of publishing. Currently serving as editor and writer for the Four States News, all while living life across the four states region from Texarkana, USA. (http://clintonsthomas.com/)

Recent Articles

TFBMW Rally Set to Start Friday

Texarkana, USA: Texarkana Fallen Bikers Memorial Wall (TFBMW), a non-profit 501(c) 3, will hold their 2021 rally this Friday through Sunday at the Texarkana Arkansas Convention Center. June 11 through June 13 will mark the annual rally with pre-registration at $60 for singles or $100 for couples. The cost of admission will include a Rally T-Shirt, patch, and access to all the weekend events, including the Friday and Saturday night meals. The doors will open Friday at 4 pm, and Saturday at 7 am.

The rally is open to all motorcyclists and the general public. There will be vendors present, Friday night bike games, meals, meet and greets, and Karaoke. Saturday morning will feature guided bike rides, an auction, and a bike and car show that will start at 12:30. Dinner Saturday will be served from 6 pm to 8 pm.

White Trash Wannabees will provide music. Sunday morning will feature a free breakfast from 9 am to 11 am, followed by a Biker Church Service at 11 am. Pre-registration can be completed online at the organization’s site TFBMW.org. For more information or to register, go online to the TFBMW home page at TFBMW.org or to the Facebook Page. The Texarkana Arkansas Convention Center is located at 5200 Convention Plaza Dr. in Texarkana, Arkansas. Google Map to the Convention Center. Continue Reading →

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Memorial Day 2021

Multiple cities have claimed to be the birthplace of Memorial Day, but in 1966 the government officially declared Waterloo, New York, as the national holiday birthplace.  The debates on the home of Memorial day came to a close, but the history remains unchanged.  Memorial Day was born on May 5, 1868, under Army General Order Number 11.  The order recognized Memorial Day, then called Decoration Day, by stating,  “The 30th of May, 1868, is designated for the purpose of strewing with flowers, or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village and hamlet churchyard in the land.”  On that first Memorial Day, over 20,000 graves of both the Union and Confederacy in Arlington cemetery were decorated with flowers. 

After the first Memorial Day, several states celebrated it.  Some celebrated at the end of May as the original date, and others chose their dates.  In World War I, the holiday transformed from commemorating those who died in the Civil War to celebrate the service of those who died in any war.  The National Holiday Act of 1971 made the last Monday of May the holiday’s official date for all fifty states.  It has since become a tradition to recite the poem “On Flanders Field” each memorial day in various countries.  

This Memorial Day is no different than any other.  We now have more wars, more conflicts, and more men and women to remember than before.  Our country has been involved in wars from the Revolution to wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.  Lives have been given both on this continent and around the world.  It is fitting and appropriate that during this three-day weekend, as you celebrate or relax, you should take a moment to remember.  

There are counties today where freedom is not allowed. There are people still to this day seeking admission, acceptance, and the opportunity to become citizens of the United States. Every day they come from countries around the world. They seek freedom, they seek possibilities, and they seek the life of the American Dream. Sadly there are those in this country claiming the American Dream is dead. They claim Socialism or some other form of government should be in place. They seek to change, modify, and even put away the freedoms promised by the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. We must remain vigilant to honor those who have given their lives to protect our freedom.

On this Memorial Day 2021, put down the burger, put down the hot dog, pause, and remember. Someone died so that you could eat that food in peace, in the home of the brave, and in the home the most desired state of existence in the world, in a state of freedom. That freedom was not free, and it will not be in the future. So take that moment to remember that someone died so that today you can look to a brighter future filled with freedom.
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Parents – A COVID Vaccine Warning

Currently the only vaccine approved for under 18 years of age is Pfizer

As summer approaches, many parents will be considering vaccine options for their children 12 years of age to 18 years of age. The only vaccine currently approved by the CDC for this age group is the Pfizer vaccine. The Moderna and the Janssen are approved for 18 years of age and up. Moderna makers are currently testing for 12 years and up, and they have reported positive responses; however, the CDC has not approved or reviewed the testing results as of this date (5-25-2021). Scheduling a vaccine can be a confusing process. Continue Reading →

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Reflecting on Good Friday

When I was younger I had a problem understanding a major verse of the Bible. The verse that bothered me came when Jesus spoke in Matthew 27:46. He said, “Eli, Eli, lema sabachthani?” The provided translations really struck me as odd. In the English Standard Version of the Bible just next to the words the rest of the verse says, “…that is, ‘My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?’” As a young man I thought the plea was a sign of surrender, giving up and lost hope on the part of Jesus. To me, as a young Christian, I thought many times, why would Jesus say this? It’s almost as if He was expecting God to save Him at the last moment or take Him off the cross? The Bible goes on to explain that those standing near the cross thought that Jesus was calling out to Elijah (Matthew 27:47). So, it appeared to me that confusion was not only present in my reading, but also in the understanding of the people there that day. At times when I read it, I felt that Jesus had truly expected a different outcome. At the time He was very close to death. The plea seemed to me to be a question to God, a wondering thought, of “Why didn’t You come save me from this death?” As I would learn later when I grew in my Christian walk, the verse and the plea had a much deeper meaning and one that we as Christians should not only cherish, but be thankful that we will never experience. As Christians, no matter what trials, tribulations, or even potential death we face, we will never face it alone. God is always with us as we are promised in Hebrews 13.5 and several other places we are told that He will never leave us or forsake us. This means that even in the worst of times we will not be alone. The meaning of Jesus’ cry though is that at the moment He was about to die, the time He should have needed God the most, God was not there. This may be shocking to think that God would turn His back on His own Son, but that is exactly what happened when Jesus cried out. For the first time in Jesus’ life, He felt no connection to God the Father. In Jesus’ own words, God had “forsaken” Him. He had left Jesus completely and utterly alone on the cross to finally die in agony and pain. The connection to God that had been so strong all His life simply vanished. Jesus, perhaps for the first time ever, was completely alone. It was so torturous to Him that it caused Him to cry out. The Romans had beat Him, humiliated Him, and were in the process of crucifying Him, but through all that He knew God was with Him. Now, suddenly, at the final moments when God should have been standing close in Jesus’ human heart and soul, God turned away. Jesus could not understand why at that moment and He cried out. It is something that we as Christians have been promised never to face – perhaps because it would be too horrible for us to stand. Continue Reading →

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Time to Spring Forward Again

Daylight Savings Time Begins

Spring 1 Hour forward

Thanks to one George Hudson and his concept of Daylight Savings Time, we will spring forward tonight at 2 a.m. by one hour. According to supporters of the process, we will all be more productive, active, and gain an extra hour of daylight so we can complete our daily task…you know, tending the crops. Some people push to end the Daylight Savings Time ritual practiced twice a year. Medical professionals in particular have concluded there is an increase in work related accidents, suicides and other health problems around the time change. While a handful of states do not practice the ritual, the rest of the country and the four states region continues to be subjected to the “Spring Forward” and “Fall Back” process each year. Continue Reading →

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Wagons for Veterans Saturday

Photo undated from a Wagons even posted on Facebook

Texarkana, AR: The Four States Fairgrounds will host Wagons for Veterans this Saturday the 13th from 11:30 a.m until the food runs out. The gates will officially open at 10 a.m. Opening ceremonies will be at 11:15 a.m. and the meals will start at 11:30 a.m. The community is encouraged to arrive early and prepared. The cost is $10 per person and that includes all you can eat. Local veteran Don Ruggles stated that last year they ran out of food. He encouraged anyone interested to arrive early and get in as quickly as possible. Continue Reading →

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Water Damage Forces Miller County Courthouse to Move

Moving help continues to be needed. Damage posted 2-19 on the Miller County Facebook Page

Miller County, AR: According to Miller County Judge Cathy Hardin-Harrison, the contents of the entire Miller County Courthouse must be moved quickly to allow for repairs. During the recent snow and ice storm, the courthouse was damaged when water pipes burst throughout the building during power outages. The damage was most significant in the basement, first and second floors. Several pictures online have showcased the extent of the damage and local news outlets have carried the story. Continue Reading →

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Girls Basketball Team Shines With Act of Love

Opinion: On December 8, the girls of Chapel Hill High School Basketball team showed the world the true meaning of sportsmanship and love which goes beyond a game of basketball. When the game whistle blew the designated tip-off player refused to jump for the tip. As the Bowie Simms Girls Team took possession of the ball, the Chapel Hill player calmly walked toward her teammates in the corner of the gym where they were kneeling in respect. Bowie Simms easily made the layup and opening point at which time the Chapel Hill team rejoined the game. This simple act of respect and honor caused an immediate response. In the stands, the Chapel Hill and Bowie Simms fans all understood the symbolic gesture made by Chapel Hill. Immediately a standing ovation was given by both sides of the gym.

On November 7, Bowie Simms lost one of their high school players to a tragic car accident. Devastated by the loss, the team canceled their scheduled November 13 game with Chapel Hill as the Bowie Simms team and community mourned. At Chapel Hill, the team followed the updates, prayed, and received word from Coach Matt Garrett on how the community was holding up.

Coach Matt Garrett has coached girl’s basketball teams to four state championships. Needless to say, he knows basketball, and he knows sportsmanship as it’s an important part of his life. Coach Garrett in reference to the girls’ actions, stated, “there are times that there are things bigger than the game of basketball.”

Garrett says his team wanted to accomplish two important things by kneeling in the opening moments of the game. They wanted to honor the grieving family, school, and community first. They also wanted to use the moment to show other students the meaning of respect and honor above the game.

Sometimes older generations worry about the future. We worry if the younger generations will rise and be the type of leaders and adults our nation needs. Well, the girls of Chapel Hill Basketball team just showed the world that it is going to be okay. By showing compassion, love, and respect that goes beyond good sportsmanship, they transcended into outstanding young adults. With young people like this team from Chapel Hill school in the small town of Mount Pleasant, Texas, coming to age as young adults, we can rest assured the future is in great hands. Chapel Hill Basketball Team Takes a knee
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County Committee Named “Best Overall County” in Arkansas

Miller County, AR: On Saturday December 5, the Republican Party of Arkansas held a statewide meeting and named the Miller County Republican Committee (MCRC) the “Best Overall County” in the state for 2020. There are seventy-two counties in the state of Arkansas with operating Republican committees. Currently all the state Constitutional offices are held by Republicans as well as all Congressional offices. The party also enjoys a majority at the capital in both the Arkansas House and Arkansas Senate. The Miller County Republican Committee was recognized as “Best Overall County” for work to help elect Republican candidates on a county, state and national level. Continue Reading →

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